2016 Reading Challenge

Last February my brother, Jeremy, showed me a reading challenge that he thought I’d be interested in trying for the year. I had successfully tracked my reading in 2015, a project Mom had urged me to do since I was a kid. It turns out that tracking what you read is easy and helpful, I should have listened. Since tracking was now a habit, and I am competitive, I decided to try the Tim Challies challenge. Here is the list, with the titles that I ended up reading for each category:


Some of the categories were challenging, some I tweaked and I was overly ambitious on some of them, but I did finish and it was a good exercise. Tracking my reading, for a challenge or just because, makes me more aware of my mental intake and more intentional about the contents of that fodder. I think about others seeing my list and about whether I would need to justify that choice. 

The list encouraged me to read some books that I wouldn’t have otherwise, or wouldn’t have yet, and several were from perspectives that I disagree with. Still, reading the arguments in a person’s own words was helpful. I found that in several cases arguments I had heard summed up or quoted by others were used accurately, even statements that I was skeptical of proved to be almost exact quotes. Some books were difficult to wade through, but worth the work. Others were boring and I was unsure of their helpfulness. Some were fascinating, some informative, some very well written, and some all three. I don’t recommend every book that I read, but I do most of them. I also recommend the process. Even if it takes a few years to work through, it’s a valuable exercise. This year I chose to do my own thing, however, and am attempting to read the rest of the books that we own but I haven’t read, or haven’t read in many years. It may be a several year endeavor, as we are always expanding and refining our library!

Here is the complete list of my books read lasts year, with author and page counts: